Moments of Wonderful

…rather than a lifetime of nothing special. A diabetes blog.

Moments of Wonderful - …rather than a lifetime of nothing special. A diabetes blog.

The story of Haiti – part 5

After yet another difficult night (including a low of 39 mg/dL at 1 am), I was up at 5 am the next morning to start the day. By this point, not sleeping well at night and getting up earlier than usual was starting to drag on me. I got just the encouragement that I needed when I opened up my devotions for that day.

“Sing praises to the Lord, O you his saints, and give thanks to his holy name. For his anger is but for a moment, and his favor is for a lifetime. Weeping may tarry for the night, but joy comes with the morning.” Psalm 30:4-5

After breakfast it was back to painting the building. I am using my journal from the week to write these blog posts, and I actually found a pink pen to write today’s entry in honor of the gallons and gallons of pink paint. The day before I had been able to somewhat stay in the shade, but since that side of the building could only be painted with roller extenders we were now painting with the sun directly behind us. Amazingly I didn’t have to take any more breaks than the rest of the team and my numbers stayed in a decent range.

After lunch, we changed into clean clothes and got on the bus to head to a local orphanage. It was always so interesting driving through the towns, seeing the damage, and seeing the spirit of the people continuing to shine through.

churchverse

One of the leaders from the children’s church on Sunday was our guide for the day. It was so much fun just laughing and spending time with the kids playing all their favorite games.

I got to hold one little girl almost the whole time. Anywhere we went throughout the trip, the kids loved playing with our hair. I had put my hair up into two French braids earlier that day but almost immediately this little girl ripped them out.

She spent the next half hour or so playing with my hair and going around to all the other girls and stealing their hair bands to add to my hair. At one point she got up and I took one spare hair tie and pulled the mess up into a ponytail. Well, when she saw what I had done, she quickly grabbed me by the arm and pulled me back over to the table to fix her work.

All too quickly it was time for us to say goodbye. The orphanage was actually right on the coast, so we took a few pictures by the water on our way back to the bus.

boat3

When we got back to the bus, a woman named Esther joined us to pray for us before we left. In her job, she travels from orphanage to orphanage helping to make sure they are set up well and have everything they need financially. She told us that that day was the first time she had seen the children smile and laugh like they have before the earthquake. It was heartbreaking to hear that a group of children had not felt like that had a reason to smile or laugh in two months!!!

beautiful facesthe eyes!

When we got back to our site, we headed over to the post-op clinic to encourage the patients. There were a few things I noticed right away. First, the clinic was located in a building that had housed part of the school before the earthquake. Behind the medical supplies, we noticed that the chalkboards had remained untouched and still displayed the lessons from January 12th.

chalkboard untouchedchalkboard untouched

The second thing I noticed was a much more familiar site.

diabetes evidence

Speaking with the patients, we first met with a man who had broken his arm. Next we went into the room of a man who had broken his tibia and fibula. I cannot even imagine the pain of that injury, and we were shocked to find out that he had not even begun to have it treated until weeks after the quake!

The last person we visited in the ward was a woman named Lucia. She was recovering from a broken hip. Through an interpreter she told us that she had fallen many times before and that God had always picked her up. She said she wasn’t sure why God did not pick her up this time but that she knew that she was where she was for a reason. Time after time, we would see the damage and devastation in Haiti, both in the people and in the property, and we would want to cry for them and with them. And time after time, the smiles from the children and the words of wisdom and hope from the adults who had been through and seen so much provided us with so much more encouragement than we could ever have hoped to provide to them.
laughter!


“Where two or three are gathered together in My name, I am there in the midst of them.” Matthew 18:20
Category: Haiti, travel
  • Colleen says:

    Thanks for the smiles this afternoon.

    March 31, 2010 at 6:08 pm
  • Cherise says:

    Sara-

    This was amazing. I know I wasn’t there with you but reading your experience has humbled me and let me know how BLESSED we truly are. Thank you again for sharing your journey.

    March 31, 2010 at 8:57 pm
  • Kathy says:

    Wow. Just wow. You are amazing!

    March 31, 2010 at 11:22 pm
  • Crystal says:

    Amazing journey. I am blown away…..

    Thank you for sharing your trip with us.

    April 1, 2010 at 3:12 am
  • m14moe says:

    Thanks Sara pics are brilliant.

    April 1, 2010 at 6:16 am
  • karena says:

    so very touching, and thank you so very much!

    April 2, 2010 at 11:40 am
  • Scott K. Johnson says:

    Love the hairdo! I think you should rock that a day or two per month just because. 🙂

    I’m also really loving your photos Sara! They are fabulous!

    April 9, 2010 at 3:39 pm

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

%d bloggers like this: