Moments of Wonderful

…rather than a lifetime of nothing special. A diabetes blog.

Moments of Wonderful - …rather than a lifetime of nothing special. A diabetes blog.

Clean but high

I’ve pretty much always known it to be true, but now I have the graphs to back me up. I can wake up with an amazing fasting number in the morning but my “getting ready” routine sends the number soaring. I have tried different methods to combat the rise, but I am not really satisfied with any of the results and so I’m looking for something new.

I am disconnected from my insulin pump for probably about 15-20 minutes as I shower and get dressed. It’s not that long, but it is also at the time of day that my basal rate is the highest. When I sleep in (read: weekends), my numbers stay level during the same time so I know it is not my basal rates; it’s my routine.
the cause of the problem
So what do you guys do for the post shower rise?

***
And yes, this picture was taken in the same location as the picture yesterday. So Crystal got it right. The sensor was resting on a book, which was resting… on the toilet. What can I say?! The lighting is good in that room! 🙂
Category: just for fun, pump
  • Schmancy says:

    Sara, have you tried to bolous a little before disconnecting? That way you will still have some of that insulin working. That may help so that you don’t go as high.

    September 28, 2010 at 8:07 am
  • Stacey D. says:

    Most of the time I don’t see a significant rise in my bg from disconnecting from showering for some reason. As a matter of fact, a lot of times showering makes me go low! I have heard of other PWD bolusing the missed dosage prior to disconnecting. I hope you find something that works!

    September 28, 2010 at 9:02 am
  • Sarah says:

    I have found that after showering and re-connecting, if I bolus about a unit, that seems to help.

    I have also found that this happens anytime I wake up. Like, Saturday mornings when I get up, clean the house, then take a shower, I’m high before I hit the shower just because I’ve been up for a while. So, you may want to take that little bit before your feet even hit the floor in the morning.

    Try things. Experiment. That’s all we can do.

    September 28, 2010 at 9:06 am
  • Crystal says:

    Trial and error, for sure.

    I sometimes run high. Many suggest a quick bolus afterward. Sometimes I run low. Depends on time of day. Basal doesn’t seem to matter for me.

    Diabetes is fun….. even in the bathroom. 🙂

    I can’t believe I was right! My crazy thought process was correct. Whoa. Freaky. Ha.

    September 28, 2010 at 9:34 am
  • Kevin says:

    I’ve had this same problem.

    I’m not sure what you do with your pump tubing after you disconnect, but I tend to wrap it around the pump itself. I’ve found that when I do this, a little bit of insulin somehow drips out of the tip of the tubing.

    So, for me, I think that what was causing it wasn’t so much the missed basal rate (I usually shower when my basal rate is pretty low), but the missed insulin from the wrapping of my tubing around the pump.

    I now do a fixed bolus *without* the site connected and I usually get anywhere from 0.3-0.5u primed before I see a little drip of insulin coming out (hard evidence that I was losing insulin!). Then I connect.

    This has helped me a LOT with my post shower highs.

    Hopefully you’ll figure out some way of dealing with yours.

    Good luck!

    September 28, 2010 at 4:52 pm
  • Karen says:

    I have had the same exact problem: http://blahblahbklyn.blogspot.com/2010/06/waking-up-is-hard-to-do.html

    I like to think of it as being allergic to waking up! 🙂 I’ve found that my wakeup bolus varies depending on my starting point. A 7:30 am BG of 80 requires a .6 bolus, while one of 110 requires something like .9. It makes no sense of course, but the numbers don’t lie!

    September 29, 2010 at 9:51 am

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